The Ripe Environment: Connection

This is the first in a series of posts about The Ripe Environment, my thoughts on how to create a space for educators and learners to want to become better educators and learners (although, one could argue that educators and learners are or should be the same thing). The first …

Never a Prophet in Your Own Town

Many edubloggers (only the most recent one I have found) and podcasters have noticed this phenomenon that it is terribly difficult to receive recognition for doing great work outside your most logical sphere of influence: your own school. This tendency leads to less willingness to collaborate with the teachers that …

Thoughts to get me through the Colorado Student Assessment Program

CSAP can do weird things to you. It kind of goes to work on your head. There is nothing unique about your test. It is the same as everyone else’s. And so you crave to do something original, to snap the unending monotony of test giving and test taking. The …

Paper is outdated.

Paper is: •   Static. •   Linear. •   Finite. •   Singular. Digital Writing is: •    Dynamic. •    Multi-dimensional. •    Infinite. •    Pluralistic. With these things in mind, all writing should be: •    Infinitely editable •    Inherently clickable •    Continually discussed •    Focused on revisions and the history of revisions. Dave Cormier …

Teacher 2.0

A lot of edubloggers are focusing on what School 2.0 should look like. I really like the idea of looking ahead (and hopefully planning ahead) for the inevitable progression of modern education. But the more that I think about what a technologically and pedagogically progressive school should look like, I …

Another Take on Blogging Rules

Like Jeanne Simpson, Karl Fisch, Anne Davis, and Darren Kuropatwa before me, I decided it was important to flesh out blogging rules for my classes. I took much guidance from these four fantastic resources, but because these limits will most affect my students, I believe that they should be the …