What does appropriate struggle look like for learners?

What does appropriate struggle look like for learners? 

12 Comments

  1. I don’t want to conflate interest and motivation, though they are very similar and play into each other. 

    I can be interested in something I’m told to learn but not motivated to see it through a struggle. 

    Capitalize on interest, motivation, learners by getting out of the way. Literally and figuratively.

  2. I don’t want to conflate interest and motivation, though they are very similar and play into each other. 

    I can be interested in something I’m told to learn but not motivated to see it through a struggle. 

    Capitalize on interest, motivation, learners by getting out of the way. Literally and figuratively.

  3. I don’t want to conflate interest and motivation, though they are very similar and play into each other. 

    I can be interested in something I’m told to learn but not motivated to see it through a struggle. 

    Capitalize on interest, motivation, learners by getting out of the way. Literally and figuratively.

  4. I like to think of it as grappling. When a learner grapples, they are actively engaged in the process of learning something new regardless of their interest in the subject although interest definitely takes it to the next level.

    You can’t really grapple with anything and not learn, can you? I love how the words actively and engaged are in my definition. It reminds me of teaching the concept of fractions to 3rd graders. In a board demonstration, some kids get it and some don’t. It is more passive. But, give kids a clementine, talk about the whole fruit, peel it in one piece, see how many segments are inside and start breaking it down while writing it on the board and you will see a classroom full of kids grappling with a new concept. It’s a beautiful thing and they get to eat the fruit when the lesson winds down as they record what fractions they have eaten and what fraction are left. It doesn’t really matter if they like fractions, they all grapple with the new understanding of fractions in life. They are truly engaged learners.

  5. I like to think of it as grappling. When a learner grapples, they are actively engaged in the process of learning something new regardless of their interest in the subject although interest definitely takes it to the next level.

    You can’t really grapple with anything and not learn, can you? I love how the words actively and engaged are in my definition. It reminds me of teaching the concept of fractions to 3rd graders. In a board demonstration, some kids get it and some don’t. It is more passive. But, give kids a clementine, talk about the whole fruit, peel it in one piece, see how many segments are inside and start breaking it down while writing it on the board and you will see a classroom full of kids grappling with a new concept. It’s a beautiful thing and they get to eat the fruit when the lesson winds down as they record what fractions they have eaten and what fraction are left. It doesn’t really matter if they like fractions, they all grapple with the new understanding of fractions in life. They are truly engaged learners.

  6. I like to think of it as grappling. When a learner grapples, they are actively engaged in the process of learning something new regardless of their interest in the subject although interest definitely takes it to the next level.

    You can’t really grapple with anything and not learn, can you? I love how the words actively and engaged are in my definition. It reminds me of teaching the concept of fractions to 3rd graders. In a board demonstration, some kids get it and some don’t. It is more passive. But, give kids a clementine, talk about the whole fruit, peel it in one piece, see how many segments are inside and start breaking it down while writing it on the board and you will see a classroom full of kids grappling with a new concept. It’s a beautiful thing and they get to eat the fruit when the lesson winds down as they record what fractions they have eaten and what fraction are left. It doesn’t really matter if they like fractions, they all grapple with the new understanding of fractions in life. They are truly engaged learners.

Leave a Reply