#C4C15: Are Digital Portfolios a Disadvantage? | Learning About Learning

There have been a couple of posts recently about how connected learning isn’t having the affect that it should, but I am still convinced that this is the right work and that we are headed in the right direction:

Your point about never hearing questions regarding connected teaching and learning should be a scandal. We should be offended when folks do not see just how much having a network of professionals who support us is vital to our ability to lead. While I too have not experienced this from the “interview” side of things, I have started to see it in other ways.

We have had a Twitter backchannel at our largest district events, where principals and teachers are expected to post something about their school or their personal experiences. We have supported unconferences for our district, in which more teachers and leaders have taken part than ever before. We have started working with many different departments to ensure that digital badges are a part of the professional learning discussion.

It isn’t fast enough, but the way in which change happens in education isn’t necessarily by starting with established processes, like interviews. It will start (or continue) on the fringes. It will happen all around the most promising work, and it will build on top of all of the connected teachers and leaders. Those that create these portfolios are those that will have the transferable skills. As an example of how this type of portfolio does help folks, this is what I made to show the power of my network: http://bit.ly/1vA9TI1 (I’m not sure it got me the Director of Blended Learning job, but it definitely didn’t hurt.)

via Are Digital Portfolios a Disadvantage? | Learning About Learning.

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